Flying Tips For Your Ears

Leaving on a jet plane can be stressful. Not just emotionally — the old John Denver song captured that — but physically too. And your ears are on the frontline.

Ears can actually be damaged by changes in air pressure that flying entails. This is known as barotrauma, which is usually a result of the eardrum being drawn inward. In extreme cases, the eardrum can break or tear. Thankfully, it’s usually only ear “popping” that is experienced when fluid relocates suddenly to equalize pressure within the ear.

In addition, it is sometimes overlooked in the excitement of flying that airliners are loud — even from the inside.

That’s obvious enough from the outside when a plane is taking off or landing, but the fact is that noise can hit 105 decibels — enough to cause problems — inside a plane’s cabin at takeoff. Even when cruising at altitude the noise level will be in the 85 decibels range. These are above the norm of everyday life.

So, being an airline passenger means being in a high noise environment. Therefore, precautions are called for.

Along with gum to deal with the ear-popping, bring some earplugs as well. There are even flying-specific models. They incorporate pressure equalization capabilities, making the ascent and descent less jarring for your inner ear while protecting you from the high-decibel noise.

If you’re bringing a device — smartphone, tablet, laptop — with you, then adding a set of noise-canceling headphones will allow you to drown out the external noise while streaming in the music, podcasts, or dialogue that you actually want to hear.

Even before you get to the airport, there are things you can do. Booking your ticket in advance has benefits, including a better chance to pick your seat. The front of the plane is farther from the engines, so seats near the nose are quieter. Same with aisle seats as opposed to window seats. It might be a matter of only a few decibels, but it’s something.