Drinking Does Not Help Your Hearing

It’s widely known that excessive drinking — especially chronic alcohol consumption — can lead to any number of health issues. And one of them is definitely degrading hearing, both over the short- and long-term.

Something to maybe think about on St. Patrick’s Day.

The first part of this is a no-brainer. There’s actually a specific part of your brain — the auditory cortex — that is dedicated to transforming the electrical impulses it receives from the ear into what you recognize as “hearing.” And needless to say, too much alcohol throws off brain function. Enough alcohol in the bloodstream and it seeps into that corner of your brain.

A more long-lasting concern is alcohol-drenched blood that can damage the tiny auditory hair in the cochlea, which is where the electronic signals sent to the auditory cortex originate. These hairs do not regenerate, so when damage occurs it’s permanent (which is why aging is often accompanied by hearing loss). This part of the inner ear is very dependent on healthy blood flow — and alcohol does not help.

As with too much alcohol in the brain throwing things off in the short-term, the same can happen in the inner ear. Alcohol is a vasodilator, meaning it relaxes blood vessels and increases blood flow (and decreases blood pressure). All of this can throw off the balance of the inner ear. This can cause tinnitus, which is an incessant ringing. And, since your balance is controlled by the inner ear, it can literally throw off your balance. They don’t call it falling down drunk for nothing.

One other St. Patrick’s Day tip. Watch out for cocktail deafness. This is when alcohol consumption makes a loud environment not seem all that loud — or at least worthy of concern. For hours and hours. And waking up with damaged ears can be one result.

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